Just One Look

Wong Yau Nam, a child, and Shawn Yue work the fishball stand in 1970's Cheng Chau.

Riley Yip’s Just One Look is a pleasant surprise of a film. Given the pop star pedigree of the cast, which includes young idols Shawn Yue, Wong Yau Nam, and both Twins (Charlene Choi and Gillian Chung), it’s not hard to come in expecting a lightweight commercialized youth romance. While romance is indeed involved, the film is also about of bitter grudges, martial arts, the transformation into adulthood, and of course, the love of cinema.

The films starts out with Fan, played by Li Ting-Fung as a child and Shawn Yue as an adult, witnessing an argument between his father (Sam Lee), a decorated policeman, and Crazy (Anthony Wong), a local triad who Fan’s father is in debt to. The two see a movie shortly afterward, and partway through, the father gets up to leave, taking one last look at his son before entering the bathroom, where gunshots are soon heard from. While the death is largely assumed to be a suicide, Fan swears for many years that Crazy was responsible. Read more of this post

The Guilty Pleasure Pile: My Wife is 18

Ekin Cheng in a rare non-preening face deals with the multi-faceted energy of Charlene Choi

Generally Speaking, we at Forced Perspective love great films and detest bad films. But what happens when one of us grows fond of a film that we know in our hearts is total crap? This is where we stash such films: The Guilty Pleasure Pile.

Several months ago in the inaugural post from The Guilty Pleasure Pile, I confessed my love for the masterpiece of marketing, Dante Lam’s The Twins Effect. Now, I turn my attention to another silly, fluffy film, the romantic comedy My Wife is 18, which actually just so happens to star both Ekin Cheng and Charlene Choi (the taller Twin) from my previous guilty pleasure. In fact, many of my guilty pleasures star either Ekin Cheng and/or one or both of the Twins, but I promise in the future I’ll try and cover something that people who don’t know every last detail about the Hong Kong film industry will actually care about.

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Whistle

Whistle is director Duncan Jones’ first film; it’s a short that appeared as a bonus feature on the DVD of Moon. Charlie Hicks plays Ryan, a man who has moved his family, including his son and wife, Diana, to a remote location where he operates as an assassin who kills his targets by remote controlled missiles that end up looking like gunshots, effectively hiding his tracks. John Shrapnel plays Paul, Ryan’s employer. The short opens with a successful assassination, but the majority of the runtime is more concerned with the strained relationship between Ryan and his wife and son, neither of whom seem happy with the move to a place in the middle of nowhere. The strain reaches a boiling point when a mission goes horribly wrong and Ryan accidentally kills a target along with the target’s child.
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